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Knitting Content

Since I have called this a knitting blog, I supposed that from time to time I should actually talk about knitting. I have actually been knitting quite a bit this week. I have been at the PLA national conference in Minneapolis, MN. I find that the sessions are prime knitting time. I don’t see this as a sign of disrespect, since I actually pay more attention when my hands are engaged. I am not a note taker anyway, so having my hands occupied doesn’t keep me from taking notes.

I have found that walking around with knitting is a great ice breaker. People either think that I am cool or crazy, but either way, I meet interesting people.

The project for the week is socks made out of Ditto yarn. I am just now turning the first heel.

I might update with a picture, but right now I am too tired, it is too windy, and I am losing light so no picture.

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How I knit socks

First a couple of notes. I knit my socks toe up 2 at a time using the Magic Loop Method. I recommend that you choose a set of symmetrical increases (3 examples) before you start knitting the socks. I use method C. This will make a pair of socks for a size 9.5-10. These can also be done with 5 or 6 DPNs (I would recommend 6), if you choose [If you need info on working these with DPNs, leave a comment or contact me on Ravelry where I am Libbazet].

Yarn: “regular” sock yarn (Trekking, Opal, etc)
Needles: 2.5mm
Guage: app 9 sts X 11 rows per 1 inch
Terms: M1=Make 1

Toe:
Cast on 24 stitches (12 per needle) using Turkish cast-on (tutorial) [also appropriate figure-8 (tutorial) and Judy’s magic cast-on (tutorial)]

The single best piece of advice that I got about these cast-ons came from Kim Salazar of WiseNeedle in her Pine Tree Toe Up Socks pattern.

Don’t worry if the stitches running down the center are loose, in a couple of rows you can tighten them up by carefully working the excess down towards the dangling tail end.

Round 1: Knit (pay close attention to stitches they may be incorrectly oriented for the knit stitch)
Round 2: *K1, M1, K10, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (14 per side)
Round 3: *K1, M1, K12, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (16 per side)
Round 4: *K1, M1, K14, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (18 per side)
Round 5: *K1, M1, K16, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (20 per side)
Round 6 and subsequent even rounds: Knit
Round 7: *K1, M1, K18, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (22 per side)
Round 9: *K1, M1, K20, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (24 per side)
Round 11 *K1, M1, K22, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (26 per side)
Round 13: *K1, M1, K24, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (28 per side)
Round 15: *K1, M1, K26, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (30 per side)
Round 17: *K1, M1, K28, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (32 per side)
Round 19: *K1, M1, K30, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (34 per side)
Round 21: *K1, M1, K32, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (36 per side)

Main foot:
Round 22: Knit
Repeat Round 22 until sock measures desired length before gusset.

  • How to figure gusset and heel length:
    Measure your row gauge. Divide the stitches
    per side by the row gauge. This is the length of
    the gusset and heel.

    • Example: My row gauge is 12. 36/12=3 I want to start the gusset 3
      inches short of total desired length.

For me that is approximately 6.5-6.75 inches (I knit both socks at the same time, so I don’t count rows. If you are knitting the socks individually, you may want to count rows.)

Decide which side will be the top and which will be the sole. The next section starts with the sole side. Knit half a round if you need to, I promise it will be okay.

Gussets:
Round 1 Sole: K1, M1, K34, M1, K1 (38 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3 Sole: K1, M1, K36, M1, K1 (40 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 5 Sole: K1, M1, K38, M1, K1 (42 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 7 Sole: K1, M1, K40, M1, K1 (44 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 9 Sole: K1, M1, K42, M1, K1 (46 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 11 Sole: K1, M1, K44, M1, K1 (48 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 13 Sole: K1, M1, K46, M1, K1 (50 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 15 Sole: K1, M1, K48, M1, K1 (52 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 17 Sole: K1, M1, K50, M1, K1 (54 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 19 Sole: K1, M1, K52, M1, K1 (56 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 21 Sole: K1, M1, K54, M1, K1 (58 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 23 Sole: K1, M1, K56, M1, K1 (60 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 24: Knit

Heel:
I lift the bar and twist for these increases.
Row 1: K18 (flap edge), PM, K23, M1, K1, PM (18 sts unworked for other edge), Turn [25 sts between Markers]
Row 2: Sl1, P23, M1, P1, Turn [26 sts between Markers]

Starting with Row 3 you will have unworked stitches between the markers.
Row 3: Sl1, K22, M1, K1, Turn [27 sts between Markers]
Row 4: Sl1, P21, M1, P1, Turn [28 sts between Markers]
Row 5: Sl1, K20, M1, K1, Turn [29 sts between Markers]
Row 6: Sl1, P19, M1, P1, Turn [30 sts between Markers]
Row 7: Sl1, K18, M1, K1, Turn [31 sts between Markers]
Row 8: Sl1, P17, M1, P1, Turn [32 sts between Markers]
Row 9: Sl1, K16, M1, K1, Turn [33 sts between Markers]
Row 10: Sl1, P15, M1, P1, Turn [34 sts between Markers]
Row 11: Sl1, K14, M1, K1, Turn [35 sts between Markers]
Row 12: Sl1, P13, M1, P1, Turn [36 sts between Markers]
Row 13: Sl1, K12, M1, K1, (you will need to remove the marker to do the next stitches) SSK (1 st from heel and 1 from flap edge), Turn

Heel flap:
Row 1: Sl1, P35, (you will need to remove the marker to do the next stitches) P2tog, Turn
Row 2: *Sl1, K1,* repeat * to * 17 times (36 sts worked), SSK, Turn
Repeat Rows 1 & 2 up the 18 flap stitches
End Row 2 when all 18 stitches have been worked [there will still be one stitch unworked on the other side]
Knit across the front
Sole: K2tog (last unworked stitch), K34, K2tog
Knit across the front
You now have 72 stitches (36 per side) again.

Leg:
Knit (or do pattern) until the leg is a length that you like.
K2, P2 ribbing

Bind Off:
K1-K1-Pass over-*P1-put 2 stitches from Rt needle back onto Left needle-P2tog-P1-put 2 stitches from Rt needle back onto Left needle-P2tog-K1-Pass over-K1-Pass over* continue * to * around the leg.

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I really do knit

I know that it seems that all I do is read, but I really do knit too (I also spin, but it has been awhile). Here is some of what I have been working on lately.

During the last two months, I have been knitting Chemo Caps for Minestrone Soup’s project. The project is over, but it was really cool. I was actually compelled to knit with “fun fur.” I can now honestly say that words can not adequately express my animosity for this yarn. Prior to this project it was kind of like a “Green Eggs and Ham” thing, since I had never actually knit with it. However, as opposed to that story where he discovers that he likes them when he tries them. I found out that I really do hate this yarn, but the hats are cute.
Muppet Hats

I did a little bit of mending for a friend. Here is the before picture, with a highlight of where the stitches were getting loose. There currently is no after picture.
Gretchen’s Gloves

I have also been working on two pairs of socks, but it has been too overcast to get good pictures.

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Photographic evidence

People seem to constantly amazed at the places that I knit. They don’t seem to realize how little of my brain power or eyesight is required for much of the knitting I do. I can and do knit during meetings, while watching tv, while standing in lines, while at the movies (bright happy movies work best for this), and while reading. People seem to have the most difficulty believing that I can knit and read at the same time. So I would like to offer photographic evidence.

Reading and Knitting

**Best guess is that I am reading Aphrodite’s Passion by Julie Kenner. With the original picture, I can read the Julie Kenner is the author. Since Tracy is the main character in Aphrodite’s Passion and I can read her name in chapter 5, I have deduced that this is the book.

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Not a finished object

I finished the fingerless gloves — sort of.

Things that I learned during this project.

1) My fingers are proportionally bigger around than my hands and wrists. The gloves fit beautifully on my hands, but the fingers are not big enough around. Since I am making these in a quest to have warmer fingers, I think that cutting off the circulation would be very detrimental to that goal.

2) Knitting the fingers on my 60 inch needle (used for the magic loop) is just a wee bit cumbersome.

3) Even if they fit, I think that there is too much fabric between my fingers to make typing feasible.

What I am going to do…

I am going to frog back to where I stopped doing the thumb increases. I am going to do two more thumb increases and then knit this like a topless mitten, instead of as fingerless gloves. I reached this decision after giving the mitts a wash to see if they would relax (they didn’t)

Here is a picture of the mitts pre-frogging

Gloves take one

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Not a pair of socks

Yesterday I started a project which is NOT a pair of socks. Don’t worry, I am still working on a pair of socks.

The project is a pair of gray fingerless gloves. My hands get very cold in my office particularly if I need to do a lot of typing, and I am hoping that these gloves will be just the right ticket.

Monday my new camera is supposed to arrive, so hopefully this will get edited to include a picture. Hopefully the picture will be more exciting than an inch of ribbing.

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Does it count as a 2007 finished object if all I did was weave in the ends? The knitting was finished sometime last summer, but I didn’t weave in the ends when I finished the knitting (even I don’t need wool socks when the temperature is 100+).

Finished Ladybug Socks

Specs:
Pattern: my formula
Needles: Addi Turbo 2.5mm 60 inch
Yarn: Opan Ladybug (see previous rant)

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