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Archive for the ‘sock knitting’ Category

How I knit socks

First a couple of notes. I knit my socks toe up 2 at a time using the Magic Loop Method. I recommend that you choose a set of symmetrical increases (3 examples) before you start knitting the socks. I use method C. This will make a pair of socks for a size 9.5-10. These can also be done with 5 or 6 DPNs (I would recommend 6), if you choose [If you need info on working these with DPNs, leave a comment or contact me on Ravelry where I am Libbazet].

Yarn: “regular” sock yarn (Trekking, Opal, etc)
Needles: 2.5mm
Guage: app 9 sts X 11 rows per 1 inch
Terms: M1=Make 1

Toe:
Cast on 24 stitches (12 per needle) using Turkish cast-on (tutorial) [also appropriate figure-8 (tutorial) and Judy’s magic cast-on (tutorial)]

The single best piece of advice that I got about these cast-ons came from Kim Salazar of WiseNeedle in her Pine Tree Toe Up Socks pattern.

Don’t worry if the stitches running down the center are loose, in a couple of rows you can tighten them up by carefully working the excess down towards the dangling tail end.

Round 1: Knit (pay close attention to stitches they may be incorrectly oriented for the knit stitch)
Round 2: *K1, M1, K10, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (14 per side)
Round 3: *K1, M1, K12, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (16 per side)
Round 4: *K1, M1, K14, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (18 per side)
Round 5: *K1, M1, K16, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (20 per side)
Round 6 and subsequent even rounds: Knit
Round 7: *K1, M1, K18, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (22 per side)
Round 9: *K1, M1, K20, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (24 per side)
Round 11 *K1, M1, K22, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (26 per side)
Round 13: *K1, M1, K24, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (28 per side)
Round 15: *K1, M1, K26, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (30 per side)
Round 17: *K1, M1, K28, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (32 per side)
Round 19: *K1, M1, K30, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (34 per side)
Round 21: *K1, M1, K32, M1, K1* Repeat *to* for the second side of the sock (36 per side)

Main foot:
Round 22: Knit
Repeat Round 22 until sock measures desired length before gusset.

  • How to figure gusset and heel length:
    Measure your row gauge. Divide the stitches
    per side by the row gauge. This is the length of
    the gusset and heel.

    • Example: My row gauge is 12. 36/12=3 I want to start the gusset 3
      inches short of total desired length.

For me that is approximately 6.5-6.75 inches (I knit both socks at the same time, so I don’t count rows. If you are knitting the socks individually, you may want to count rows.)

Decide which side will be the top and which will be the sole. The next section starts with the sole side. Knit half a round if you need to, I promise it will be okay.

Gussets:
Round 1 Sole: K1, M1, K34, M1, K1 (38 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3 Sole: K1, M1, K36, M1, K1 (40 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 5 Sole: K1, M1, K38, M1, K1 (42 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 7 Sole: K1, M1, K40, M1, K1 (44 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 9 Sole: K1, M1, K42, M1, K1 (46 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 11 Sole: K1, M1, K44, M1, K1 (48 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 13 Sole: K1, M1, K46, M1, K1 (50 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 15 Sole: K1, M1, K48, M1, K1 (52 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 17 Sole: K1, M1, K50, M1, K1 (54 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 19 Sole: K1, M1, K52, M1, K1 (56 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 21 Sole: K1, M1, K54, M1, K1 (58 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 23 Sole: K1, M1, K56, M1, K1 (60 sts)– Top: Knit
Round 24: Knit

Heel:
I lift the bar and twist for these increases.
Row 1: K18 (flap edge), PM, K23, M1, K1, PM (18 sts unworked for other edge), Turn [25 sts between Markers]
Row 2: Sl1, P23, M1, P1, Turn [26 sts between Markers]

Starting with Row 3 you will have unworked stitches between the markers.
Row 3: Sl1, K22, M1, K1, Turn [27 sts between Markers]
Row 4: Sl1, P21, M1, P1, Turn [28 sts between Markers]
Row 5: Sl1, K20, M1, K1, Turn [29 sts between Markers]
Row 6: Sl1, P19, M1, P1, Turn [30 sts between Markers]
Row 7: Sl1, K18, M1, K1, Turn [31 sts between Markers]
Row 8: Sl1, P17, M1, P1, Turn [32 sts between Markers]
Row 9: Sl1, K16, M1, K1, Turn [33 sts between Markers]
Row 10: Sl1, P15, M1, P1, Turn [34 sts between Markers]
Row 11: Sl1, K14, M1, K1, Turn [35 sts between Markers]
Row 12: Sl1, P13, M1, P1, Turn [36 sts between Markers]
Row 13: Sl1, K12, M1, K1, (you will need to remove the marker to do the next stitches) SSK (1 st from heel and 1 from flap edge), Turn

Heel flap:
Row 1: Sl1, P35, (you will need to remove the marker to do the next stitches) P2tog, Turn
Row 2: *Sl1, K1,* repeat * to * 17 times (36 sts worked), SSK, Turn
Repeat Rows 1 & 2 up the 18 flap stitches
End Row 2 when all 18 stitches have been worked [there will still be one stitch unworked on the other side]
Knit across the front
Sole: K2tog (last unworked stitch), K34, K2tog
Knit across the front
You now have 72 stitches (36 per side) again.

Leg:
Knit (or do pattern) until the leg is a length that you like.
K2, P2 ribbing

Bind Off:
K1-K1-Pass over-*P1-put 2 stitches from Rt needle back onto Left needle-P2tog-P1-put 2 stitches from Rt needle back onto Left needle-P2tog-K1-Pass over-K1-Pass over* continue * to * around the leg.

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Does it count as a 2007 finished object if all I did was weave in the ends? The knitting was finished sometime last summer, but I didn’t weave in the ends when I finished the knitting (even I don’t need wool socks when the temperature is 100+).

Finished Ladybug Socks

Specs:
Pattern: my formula
Needles: Addi Turbo 2.5mm 60 inch
Yarn: Opan Ladybug (see previous rant)

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Knots

Few things annoy me more than finding a knot in my skein of yarn. The more expensive the yarn, the more aggravating the knots. So last summer when I was knitting with Opal Ladybug and came to a knot I was very annoyed. I tried to be sanguine about it and continue on my way. Then the stripes didn’t match up. So I ripped back. I cut out some of the pink (so that I had the same amount on each sock [I ALWAYS knit both socks at the same time]). I knit on again. The stripes didn’t match again. I ripped back AGAIN. This had now moved into a major annoyance. I decided that I should be more scientific about the procedure. I carefully examined the yarn from both skeins and what do you suppose I found. After the knot, the stripe pattern was wound BACKWARDS. BACKWARDS!! I mean really how annoying.

Opal Socks

Because of the knot I had automatically had two more ends than I should have. Then because of the amount that I had cut out (before realizing that it was BACKWARDS), I had to piece the end of the socks. So all total, my sock which should have had two ends had TEN ends. That is five times as many ends.

Opal Ends

How annoying.

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FO 1

I have achieved the first finished object of the year. It is a new pair of socks (big surprise to those who know me). My journey to sock land was not an easy one. For years, I would look longingly at sock patterns. I would undertake (and sometimes complete) the first sock in a pair, but I NEVER EVER made the second sock. I would start with the best of intentions, but by the time I finished the first sock, the charm of making my own socks would have faded.

Then I discovered that I could do two socks at once using the magic loop method. You would have thought that this would have solved my sock issues, but no I still had to graft the toes. Words cannot truly express how I feel about grafting (though I sometimes try).

Then in April of 2005, I did my first pair of toe-up socks (two at a time of course) and I haven’t looked back since. I initially used the figure-8 cast on (fiddly, but worth it). I learned this technique using WiseNeedle’s (Kim Salazar) instructions which can be found here. This was actually the pattern that I used for the first pair I made using this method (and in a major departure for me I not only used the yarn specified, I even used the same color). I think that Kim probably saved what little sanity I have by letting me know that it was possible to tighten up that first row of stitches later. Then I discovered the Turkish cast on (tutorial by FluffyKnitterDeb here). I will admit that I don’t actually follow these instructions. I have never used a slip knot, I just wrap and go. I find the Turkish cast on to be less fiddly. Another advantage is that all of your stitches are oriented correctly (or incorrectly depending on which direction you wrap). In the figure 8 cast on, only one side is correct. Not that this is difficult to overcome, but is is annoying.

When I made this first pair, I kind of made up my own heel. The Widdershins pattern has a very similiar heel construction.

Now I would never presume to say that this is the best way to make socks, but I will say that it is the best way for me to knit socks. I know this because, as previously mentioned, when I knit socks on double pointed I never made the second sock. When I did the first pair on the magic loop (top down), I didn’t knit another sock for 6 months. I knit the first pair using this method in April of 2005 and I now have 25+ pairs and more on the way. FO 1

The specs:
Yarn: Meilenweit Mega Boots Stretch
Needle: Addi Trubo 2.5mm 60 inch needle
Color: 716
Pattern: My standard foot with Textured Strip (December 27) of 365 Knitting Stitches a Year up the leg

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Christmas Socks

I have started a pair of socks with a skein of my Christmas yarn. The yarn is Ribbon Candy by WhiteWillow and is a delight to work with. Pictures of the socks will follow at a later date.

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